The average crowdfunding campaign for cancer care asks for $20,000 — but only gets about $5,000

(CNN)The cost of cancer treatment has gotten so high that patients and their families are turning to crowdfunding websites, like GoFundMe. But a new study found that cancer patients raising money on GoFundMe are only reaching about a quarter of their goal on average. “Although the Affordable Care Act reduced the uninsured rate, cost containment measures have not been realized by all patients,” the study noted. Medical fundraisers make up 1 in 3 of GoFundMe campaigns, and bring in more money than any other category, the company CEO Rob Solomon told MPR News last year. If a GoFundMe campaign doesn’t reach its goal, the fundraiser can still collect the amount that’s raised.

Malaria breakthrough as scientists find highly effective way to kill parasite

Drugs derived from Ivermectin, which makes human blood deadly to mosquitoes, could be available within two years Human trials of new antimalarial drugs are in the pipeline after Kenyan scientists successfully used bacteria to kill the parasite that causes the disease. The Kenya Medical Research Institute (Kemri) and global health partners say the breakthrough could potentially lead to the development of a new class of drugs in less than two years. The promise of a new treatment comes after in Burkina Faso proved that Ivermectin, a conventional drug used for parasitic diseases including river blindness and elephantiasis, reduced transmission rates. The medication worked by making the blood of people who were repeatedly vaccinated studies conducted by the World Health Organization …

Vegetarians might have higher risk of stroke than meat eaters, study says

(CNN)Non-meat diets have soared in popularity with many people ditching beef, pork and chicken in pursuit of health and environmental benefits and concerns about animal welfare. The exact reasons for this higher risk found in vegetarians are not clear, said Tong. It is possible that this is due to “very low cholesterol levels or very low levels of some nutrients,” she said. “There is some evidence which suggests that very low cholesterol levels might be associated with a slightly higher risk of hemorrhagic stroke,” she said. Similarly, other research points to deficiencies of some nutrients, like vitamin B12, may be linked to a higher risk of stroke, said Tong. Still, some researchers were skeptical of the stroke finding. The research …

Want to live longer? You may want to ditch these drinks

(CNN)Brace yourself, lovers of diet sodas and sugary drinks. It’s more bad news and yet another reason to consider ditching your favorite soda or soft drink. “Experimental evidence suggests that high blood sugar and high sugar intake can impair the gut barrier, leading to a ‘leaky gut’ and access to the gut immune system causing intestinal inflammation, alter gut microbiota and increase susceptibility to gut infections,” she said. “These pathways may increase susceptibility to digestive diseases.” Total soft drink consumption in the study was also associated with an increased risk for Parkinson’s disease, but not with Alzheimer’s or cancer. Soft drinks were defined as “low calorie or diet fizzy soft drinks”, “fizzy soft drinks,” such as cola and lemonade, and …

Scientists discover way to grow tooth enamel

Experts produce clusters of enamel-like calcium phosphate to crack age-old problem Scientists say they have finally cracked the problem of repairing tooth enamel. Though enamel is the hardest tissue in the body, it cannot self-repair. Now scientists have discovered a method by which its complex structure can be reproduced and the enamel essentially grown back. The team behind the research say the materials are cheap and can be prepared on a large scale. After intensive discussion with dentists, we believe that this new method can be widely used in future, said Dr Zhaoming Liu, co-author of the research from Zhejiang University in China. Tooth decay is extremely common: according to journal Science Advances, say they got around this problem by …

Deaths from heart disease and these other conditions are on the rise, research suggests

(CNN)Death rates in the United States due to cardiometabolic diseases — heart disease, stroke, diabetes and high blood pressure — have either plateaued or climbed in recent years, new research reveals. “We need to reduce deaths from cardiometabolic diseases and we need to find strategies to reduce disparities,” she said. The new research involved analyzing data from death certificates in the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s WONDER database. The death certificates dated from 1999 to 2017. The data showed that in 1999, total deaths by cause were 725,192 from heart disease, 167,366 from stroke, 68,399 from diabetes, and 16,968 from hypertension. In 2017, total deaths by cause were 647,457 from heart disease, 146,383 from stroke, 83,564 from diabetes, …

No ‘gay gene’ can predict sexual orientation, study says

(CNN)Sexual orientation cannot be predicted by a single “gay gene,” new research indicates. Same-sex attraction appears to run in families, and identical twins are more likely to be aligned in their sexuality than either fraternal twins or other siblings, noted the researchers. Both these factors suggest genetic influences are at play. Researchers conducted analyses of data for 477,522 participants in surveys from the UK and US, and then performed comparison testing among some 15,142 people in the US and Sweden. Different base studies provided different survey results. Some surveys recorded whether participants ever had a same-sex partner, and others recorded how people identified their orientation. Several hundred genes appeared to have an influence on sexuality. Five variants showed significant effects, …

Pinterest makes aggressive new move in fight against vaccine misinformation

Users who search for terms related to vaccines will be presented with information from major public health organizations When Pinterest realized in 2018 that the search results for many health-related terms such as vaccines or cancer cure were polluted with non-scientific misinformation, the visual social media site took a promotion of anti-vaccine propaganda this year, as measles outbreaks spread in the US, Europe and Asia. A adopted new policies toward anti-vaccine misinformation this spring in response to pressure from public health organizations, politicians and the press. Facebook began reducing the reach of groups and pages that spread verifiable vaccine hoaxes, Amazon removed several anti-vaccine propaganda movies from its streaming video service, and YouTube moved to include anti-vaccine misinformation in a …

The climate crisis could make it more dangerous to play sports outdoors

(CNN)About this time every year, there are news reports about student athletes who collapse during practice while getting ready for a big game. Heat illness can lead to death and injury among athletes, and a new report examines why the risk could be rising. The past four years have been the warmest in the United States since record keeping began in 1895. Sign up here to get The Results Are In with Dr. Sanjay Gupta every Tuesday from the CNN Health team. Since 1995, 64 football players alone have died from heat stroke and 90% of them died during practice, an earlier study showed. The rate of football heat stroke deaths fell in recent years, a decline researchers said supported …

Dying for a new body: why so many deaths from plastic surgery tourism?

New Yorkers flock to the Dominican Republic for cheaper plastic surgery procedures, but not all of them return home. Sharilene Cedeo used to joke with her sister Kendra that she was going to be 23 forever. Cedeo, daughter of Dominican immigrants, was obsessed with staying young and by extension, plastic surgery. Coworkers at the Manhattan clinic where she was a nurses assistant would catch her looking at dramatic before and after photos on surgeons social media pages. One day she saw a friends Instagram post after a procedure by surgeon Edgar Contreras, whos based in the Dominican Republic. That was it. After years of feeling unattractive compared to women who had gotten done, Cedeo was ready. Her friend Tiffany Concha, …

Patient’s death could be first in US linked to vaping, officials say

Illinois case forms part of investigation into illnesses in teens or adults who had used e-cigarettes US health officials are reporting what could be the countrys first death linked to vaping. The officials said on Friday that an adult patient in Illinois, who contracted a serious lung disease after vaping, had died and that they considered it the first death in the US linked to e-cigarettes. The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) received the report of the death on Thursday, the chief medical officer, Dr Jennifer Layden, said. Officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 193 people in 22 states had contracted severe respiratory illnesses after vaping. However, they said a clear common cause of the …

After the wildfire: treating the mental health crisis triggered by climate change

In 2017, thousands of homes in Santa Rosa, California, were wiped off the map. Now the community is helping residents cope with the trauma The nightmares kept coming and David Leal knew he was in trouble. A navy veteran with a can-do attitude and a solidly middle-class IT job at a hospital in Santa Rosa, California, he didnt think of himself as mentally vulnerable. But when the Tubbs fire snatched his house off the face of the earth in the early morning hours of 9 October 2017, it hit him hard. Long story short, I went through a lot of PTSD, Leal says, as we tour his nearly rebuilt home in Santa Rosas Coffey Park neighborhood. Wildfires are not uncommon …

After a breakdown, birdwatching brought me friendship, escape and a new love of nature

A childhood hobby gave me time to reflect, refocus and find myself again, following years of drug and alcohol abuse A decade ago, aged 22 and off my face on class A drugs and alcohol almost every day, I would never have seen myself where I am today and definitely wouldnt have dreamed that Bird Therapy that birds are consistent in a way that people rarely are and I stand by this. Too often, we are let down by those we believe care about us, but I know that if I look out of my kitchen window, my garden bird community will still be there. I also know that during spring, our returning breeding birds will travel across desert and …

He jumped off the Golden Gate Bridge and survived. Now, he’s seeing his wish for a safety net come true

(CNN)“Jump.” In midair, he maneuvered himself so that his legs would hit the water first. Hines fell 220 feet at about 75 miles per hour. The impact from a fall like that is similar to hitting concrete. The contact shattered two of his vertebrae, and doctors later told him that he was only 2 millimeters away from severing his spine. In excruciating pain, Hines struggled to the surface and felt a creature nudging at him.

Why are thirtysomethings lonely? Because society doesnt value friendship | Arwa Mahdawi

Social media has been made the scapegoat for millennials reporting loneliness, but the cultural primacy in adulthood of career and family has much to answer for, writes Arwa Mahdawi Millennials arent just the poorest generation; they are also the loneliest. According to data from YouGov, while digital habits undoubtedly affect mental health, research hasnt provided conclusive answers regarding the relationship between the two. When it comes to loneliness, I have a feeling that the culprit isnt so much technology as the fact that many millennials are in their 30s, which is a natural time for friendship dynamics to change: people start focusing on advancing their careers and building families rather than socialising with pals. It feels as if we are …

Alzheimers blood test could predict onset up to 20 years in advance

US researchers say blood test can be 94% effective in spotting those at risk of the disease A blood test that can detect signs of Alzheimers as much as 20 years before the disease begins to have a debilitating effect has been developed by researchers in the US. Scientists at the Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis in Missouri believe the test can identify changes in the brain suggestive of Alzheimers with 94% accuracy, while being much cheaper and simpler than a PET brain scan. The results of the study, which was published in the journal Neurology on Thursday, represent a potential breakthrough in the fight against the disease. Right now we screen people for clinical trials with …